Wednesday, 13 February 2019

PRAABS Matriculation of 100 years ago today

The Lyon Office has tweeted another superb matriculation from exactly 100 years ago today.

The arms of Rev. Francis Ewen Cameron.


The blazon is: Argent, three bars Gules within a bordure Azure charged with eight garbs of the first, in chief a crescent of the second for difference.


Monday, 11 February 2019

John Buchan, 1st Baron Tweedsmuir PC GCMG GCVO CH (1875 – 1940)

Today is the anniversary of the death in 1940 of the novelist, John Buchan. Born in Perth, Buchan grew up in Glasgow where he attended Hutchesons' Grammar School and Glasgow University, before reading Law at Oxford and going into politics and the Civil Service. He died in office as Governor General of Canada for which post King George V had created him 1st Baron Tweedsmuir.

His arms were recorded in 1935 (volume 31, folio 60):

The blazon reads:
Azure a fess between three lions erased Argent.
Crest: a sunflower proper.
Supporters: (dexter) A stag proper attired Or collared Gules and (sinister) a falcon proper jessed belled and beaked Or armed and collared Gules.







Saturday, 9 February 2019

Vice-President in Stirling

HSS Vice-President Elizabeth Roads gave the Vote of Thanks at the Dean's Dinner of the Merchant Guildry of Stirling at the start of its Nonacentenary year.



The blazon for the arms, granted in 2016, is:

Vert, an enarched bridge of seven arches Argent, in chief the reversed numeral 4 in baroque style.
Crest: a tower Argent masoned Sable port Gules issuant from the parapet a unicorn's head Or.

The Lord Lyon in Barrhead

Lyon's tweet this morning 

"The Lord Lyon gave the after dinner lecture to Lodge Randolph No 1434 in Barrhead on the subject of “Three Centuries of the Usage of Masonic Symbols in Scottish Heraldry". Lodge Randolph is part of the Provincial Grand Lodge of Renfrewshire East which recorded arms in 1928."

reminds me of a point Snawdoun Herald recently made to me. It is customary to put the parent coat in the dexter of an impalement but in the flurry of masonic registrations in the late 1920s beginning wtih the Grand Lodge of Scotland in 1927, the parent coat is consistently in the sinister, perhaps simply replacing Scotland in the Grand Lodge's arms. This makes the various Lodge arms look very consistent with each other, if not with the usual practice.




From left to right:
Grand Lodge of Scotland: 
Renfrewshire East
Rutherglen Grand Arch
Kilwinning 

The Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of Scotland:
Parted per pale Azure and Vert, in the dexter, on the sinister, on a chevron Or, between three towers proper a pair of compasses extended chevronwise Sable.
20/10/1927 (Vol 27 fol 62)

Provincial Grand Lodge of Renfrewshire East.
Parted per pale Azure and Vert, in the dexter a lymphad sails furled Argent, on a shield Or pendant from the yard a fess chequy of the third and first, a chief gyronny of eight Gold and Sable each charged with a trefoil slipped counterchanged; on the sinister, on a chevron Or, between three towers proper a pair of compasses extended chevronwise Sable.
18/1/1928 (Vol 27 fol 69) 

The Lodge Rutherglen Royal Arch
Parted per pale Gules and Vert,in the dexter an open book proper charged with a square and compasses Sable, between two columns supporting an arch of six stones and keystone issuing from three steps Or, set on  tessalated pavement Argent and of the Fourth, in dexter chief the sun in his splendour proper and in the sinister an increscent moon of the Sixth, on  chief Azure seven stars four and three of the Sixth; and in the sinister, on a chevron Gold between three towers proper a pair of compasses extended chevronwise of the Fourth.
14/3/1928 (Vol 27 fol 76)  

The Lodge Renfrew County Kilwinning 
Parted per pale Azure and Vert, in the dexter a lymphad, sail furled Argent, on a shield Or pendant from the yard, a representation of Saint Winning pontifically vested, but without a mitre, holding in his dexter hand a pastoral staff and in his sinister a book all proper; and in the sinister, on a chevron Or, between three towers proper a pair of compasses extended chevronwise Sable.
20/2/1928 (Vol 27 fol 73)








Friday, 8 February 2019

The Post Office

The Public Register of All Arms and Bearings in Scotland contains the results of several petitions by our late member, Henry Tilling. In his time as Chairman of the Scottish Postal Board, he petitioned to have the arms of the Post Office re-matriculated to take account of changes in technology and function.

Here are the arms recorded in 1970, following the Post Office Act of 1969:

(vol 50 folio110): Gules, billetty bendwise Argent a barrulet wavy Or.
Crest: a phoenix proper holding in the beak a caduceus Or.
Supporters: upon a compartment of grass Vert bisected palewise by water barry wavy Argent and Azure are set for supporters on either side a pegasus Or crowned with an ancient crown and gorged with a collar Gules charged with a barrulet wavy Or.


The revised arms were created as the British Telecommunications Act of 1981 removed telecommunications from the functions of the Post Office so the barrulets, symbolic of buzzing wires, could be removed. Reference was also sought in the arms to the National Girobank, an  important function of the Post Office, hence the arrival of the bezants:


1981 (vol 62 folio 59)
Gules, billetty bendwise Argent and in fess four bezants 
Crest: a lion sejant grasping in its dexter forepaw a caduceus in pale, Gold.
Supporters: upon a compartment of grass Vert bisected palewise by water barry wavy Argent and Azure are set for supporters on either side a pegasus Or crowned with an ancient crown and gorged with a collar Gules charged of four bezants.


Incidentally, the caduceus is often mistakenly thought to represent medicine (which should use the single-snaked Rod of Asclepius) but is in fact a symbol of Hermes - of messages.

A few years later, the Post Office, probably Henry again, petitioned for a more everyday Ensign:





February Meeting Cancelled

As a mark of respect to our deceased colleague and friend, David Sellar, formerly Lord Lyon King of Arms, whose funeral takes place that day, the Meeting scheduled for 23rd February has been cancelled. Accordingly, the next lecture meeting of the Society will be held on Saturday 30 March.


Thursday, 7 February 2019

Funeral of Henry Tilling KStJ

The funeral this afternoon for our oldest member, Henry Tilling, took place in Rosslyn Chapel. The Society was represented by the Chairman, President, and President Emeritus, Charles Burnett KStJ, who gave a most affectionate and moving tribute, the Editor, the Social Secretary, the Treasurer and several other members of the Society. The service was conducted by Bishop Douglas Cameron, an old friend of Henry's, and some clues were given as to Henry's remarkable life and career which will be covered in a little more detail in the next Tak Tent.  The Lyon Office was represented by Snawdoun Herald, Dingwall and Unicorn Pursuivants.


May he rest in peace.